Genetics B.S./Genetics M.S.

The field of genetics has taken on broader importance in clinical and other professional settings. For example, personal genomics has become well established in oncology and will likely be widely available in clinical settings soon. The broad application of genetic technologies will likely spur the need for workers with advanced skills in this field. The department recognizes the growing importance of these opportunities and believe there is unmet demand for the kind of training that will prepare our students to pursue these new career paths. Therefore, there exist expanding opportunities for students with the additional training possible with an M.S. degree. We anticipate that an M.S. will expand opportunities for students who wish to enter such a clinical or professional career.

A thesis provides increased opportunities for further graduate study. One year of additional coursework at the graduate-level and a thesis will make those students better prepared to bridge to an additional graduate degree.

Admission to Program

After completing 60 hours of undergraduate coursework (summer of year two), including both GENE 3000 and GENE 3200, students will apply to the Pathway and be allowed to take the 4 graduate courses prior to formal admission to the M.S. program. Students need to have at minimum a 3.2 GPA for admission to the Pathway.

Curriculum

Graduate-level courses that may be used to satisfy undergraduate and graduate program requirements.

GENE 6000 and GENE 6200 form the core required graduate courses that can be used to satisfy undergraduate program requirements.

In addition, any two GENE courses at the 6000-8000 level can be used to satisfy undergraduate program requirements. Students may substitute one 6000-level course listed in the Group II electives for the undergraduate B.S. for a GENE 6000-level course.

Additional requirements that are unique to this Double Dawgs program:

The student must be continuing research under the supervision of the same faculty member in which s/he completed an undergraduate thesis and must have a letter of support from that faculty member.

Students must take either (GENE 8150 and 8150L) or (GENE 8920 or GENE 8930). Graduate electives can be selected from any appropriate course at the 6000-8000 level, chosen in consultation with the graduate adviser and approved by the graduate adviser. A maximum of 6 hours of GENE 7000 can be applied to the program of study.

Students are required to conduct an original research project (GENE 7000, Master's Research), and prepare and defend a Master's thesis on their research (GENE 7300, Master's Thesis).

Admission to Graduate Program

Students will formally apply to the M.S. program in the fall of year four.

After completing 90 hours of undergraduate coursework, students will formally apply to the M.S. program.

Students need to have a 3.2 GPA to apply to the M.S. program.

The student must be continuing research in the lab in which he/she completed an undergraduate thesis.

Students will require letters from 2 Genetics faculty supporting admission to the M.S. program, including one from the faculty member who will supervise the M.S. research. The faculty member must state in that letter that s/he is willing to serve as the thesis adviser and support the research being conducted.

Students must complete all graduate courses and successfully defend their Master's thesis in the spring semester of the final year before they can obtain the M.S.

Program Advisor

  • Name: Mary Bedell
  • Email: bedell@uga.edu
  • Phone: 706-542-0288
  • Address: C110 Davison Life Sciences

Undergraduate Major Information

  • Major: Genetics B.S.
  • Department/College: Genetics

Advising Contact

  • Name: Mary Bedell
  • Email: bedell@uga.edu
  • Phone: 706-542-0288
  • Address: C110 Davison Life Sciences

Graduate Major Information

  • Major: Genetics M.S.
  • Department/College: Genetics

Advising Contact

  • Name: Kelly Dyer
  • Email: kdyer@uga.edu
  • Phone: 706-542-3154
  • Address: C228 Davison Life Sciences