Genetics B.S./Genetics M.S. (non-thesis)

The field of genetics has taken on much broader importance in clinical and other professional settings. For example, personal genomics has become well established in oncology and will likely be widely available in clinical settings soon. The broad application of genetic technologies will likely spur the need for workers with advanced skills in this field. The department recognizes the growing importance of these opportunities and believe there is unmet demand for the kind of training that will prepare our students to pursue these new career paths. Although we recognize the importance of training students to do research, we recognize that there are many more career paths now, or soon to be, available to students with advanced knowledge of genetics that can be obtained through graduate-level coursework.

In addition, one traditional career path for genetics students is work as a technician in the biomedical and pharmaceutical industries. A non-thesis M.S. may or may not guarantee a job as a technician in the biotech industry, but having a non-thesis M.S. may result in higher starting salaries for students who obtain those jobs.

Admission to Program

After completing 60 hours of undergraduate coursework (Summer of year two), including both GENE 3000 and GENE 3200, students will apply to the Pathway and be allowed to take the 4 graduate courses prior to formal admission to the M.S. program.

Students need to have at minimum a 3.2 GPA for admission to the Pathway.

Curriculum

Graduate-level courses that may be used to satisfy undergraduate and graduate program requirements.

GENE 6000 and GENE 6200 form the core required graduate courses that can be used to satisfy undergraduate program requirements.

In addition, any 2 GENE courses at the 6000-8000 level can be used to satisfy undergraduate program requirements. Students may substitute one 6000-level course listed in the Group II electives for the undergraduate B.S. for a GENE 6000-level course.

Additional requirements that are unique to this Double Dawgs program:

Students must take either (GENE 8150 and 8150L) or (GENE 8920 or GENE 8930). Graduate electives can be selected from any appropriate course at the 6000-8000 level, chosen in consultation with the graduate adviser and approved by the graduate adviser.

Students must enroll in GENE 7100 and pass a comprehensive examination in the spring of the final year.

Admission to Graduate Program

Students will formally apply to the M.S. program in the Fall of year four.
After completing 90 hours of undergraduate coursework, students will formally apply to the M.S. program.
• Students need to have a 3.2 GPA to apply to the M.S. program.
• Students will require letters from 2 Genetics faculty supporting admission to the M.S. program.
• Students must complete all graduate courses and successfully pass a comprehensive examination in the spring of the final year before they can obtain the M.S.

Program Advisor

  • Name: Mary Bedell
  • Email: bedell@uga.edu
  • Phone: 706-542-0288
  • Address: C110 Davison Life Sciences

Undergraduate Major Information

  • Major: Genetics B.S.
  • Department/College: Genetics

Advising Contact

  • Name: Mary Bedell
  • Email: bedell@uga.edu
  • Phone: 706-542-0288
  • Address: C110 Davison Life Sciences

Graduate Major Information

  • Major: Genetics M.S.
  • Department/College: Genetics

Advising Contact

  • Name: Kelly Dyer
  • Email: kdyer@uga.edu
  • Phone: 706-542-3154
  • Address: C228 Davison Life Sciences